NICU Clinical Quality Data

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit  (NICU) at Cedars-Sinai is a 45-bed, state-of-the-art facility designed to address the needs of critically ill babies, premature newborns or infants requiring close observation.  The Cedars-Sinai Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is a designated California Children's Services Regional Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. 

Because the Cedars-Sinai Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is a Level 3C provider of newborn services, babies born at Cedars-Sinia never need to be transported out of the medical center for a higher level of care. The NICU also treats babies delivered elsewhere and transferred to Cedars-Sinai for care. Between those born inside and outside Cedars-Sinai, approximately 750 babies are cared for in the NICU each year.

Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Cedars-Sinai have 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week access to in-house neonatologists. All Cedars-Sinai neonatologists are board-certified specialists who have met the requirements of education, training and experience to care for California Children's Services patients. The unit provides access to consultants, surgeons and support services that allow treatment across the full range of neonatal problems. It provides four levels of care including:

  • Intensive
  • Intermediate
  • Isolation
  • Continuing care

The NICU is equipped with the latest technology and offers the most modern treatment modalities to provide the highest level of care. All high-risk infants are followed up after their discharge from the unit.

Specific quality of care measures at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Cedars-Sinai are described below. To learn more about how patient families evaluated their experience at the Cedars-Sinai Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, click here.

Neonatal Mortality Rate

The table below shows how Cedars-Sinai's neonatal mortality rate compares with that of other Neonatal Intensive Care Units across the nation. The national data was collected in 2011 and reported in the March 2013 issue of Pediatrics.

A lower percentage is better than a higher one.

Neonatal Mortality RateCedars-Sinai 20122011 Vital Statistics, Pediatrics, March 2013
The Neonatal Mortality Rate reflects the percent of babies who do not survive beyond the first 28 days of life.0.22%0.40%


Quality Measures for Very Low Birth Weight Babies

Babies who weigh between 500 to 1,500 grams (1.1 to 3.3 pounds) at birth have special challenges that must be overcome if they are to survive. The following table shows factors that are measured to determine the quality of care provided to very low birth weight babies.

A low percentage is better than a high percentage.

Quality Measures for
Very Low Birth Weight Babies
Cedars-Sinai 2012National Average 2012 VON
Chronic Lung Disease. This reflects the percentage of very low birth weight babies who need continuous supplemental oxygen support28.6%24.5%
Intraventricular Hemorrhage. This reflects the percentage of very low birth weight babies who have severe bleeding in the ventricles of the brain.4.8%6.9%
Periventricular Leukomalacia: The percentage of very low birth weight babies whose brains develop multiple small cysts in the white matter.1.6%2.3%
Nosocomial Infection: This reflects the percentage of very low birth weight babies who have acquired infections in the hospital6.2%13.1%
Hearing Loss. The percentage of very low birth weight babies who fail an initial hearing screen exam.4.8%N/A
Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity: The percentage  of very low birth weight babies with abnormal development of retinal blood vessels.0%6.1%

* The Vermont Oxford Network is an organization of more than 850 Neonatal Intensive Care Units, the majority of which are in the United States. The goal of the network is to improve the quality and safety of medical care by collecting and sharing comparative data from its members on the care and outcomes of high-risk newborns.