Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

The success of a kidney-pancreas or pancreas transplant depends on appropriate evaluation of the recipient, expertise in the surgical procedures required to transplant the organs and on-going monitoring after transplant to prevent organ rejection or infections. 

At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center,  survival rates are tracked for transplant patients.These data are reported to the  Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients

Pancreas Transplants

Pancreas Transplants*
(Adults Age 18+ Only)
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Patient Survival for:1 Year3 Years
For transplants performedJan 2011 -
June 2013
July 2008 -
Dec 2010
Number of transplants10
Percent of patients surviving at
the end of period observed**
100.00%n/a
Expected survival rate for patients of similar ages, blood type, and health condition***95.71%94.95%



Pancreas After Kidney Transplants*
(Adults Age 18+ Only)
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Patient Survival for:1 Year3 Years
For transplants performedJan 2011 -
June 2013
July 2008 -
Dec 2010
Number of transplants43
Percent of patients surviving at the end of period observed**100.00%100.00%
Expected survival rate for patients of similar ages, blood type, and health condition***99.59%96.43%


Simultaneous Kidney-Pancreas Transplants

Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplants*
(Adults Age 18+ Only)
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Patient Survival for:1 Year3 Years
For transplants performedJan 2011 -
June 2013
July 2008 -
Dec 2010
Number of transplants1514
Percent of patients surviving at the
end of period observed**
90.00%92.86%
Expected survival rate for
patients of similar ages, blood type, and health condition***
97.26%93.65%

* These statistic reflect adults age 18+ who were having their first kidney-pancreas transplant. Patients who were having other organ transplants along with a kidney-pancreas transplant are not included. In the event of a graft failure, a single patient can have more than one transplant.

** Observed survival rates use the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate outcomes for patients for whom complete follow-up is not expected. Because different cohorts are followed for each time period, it is possible for the reported three-year survival to exceed one-year survival.

*** The survival rate that would be expected for the patients served by this center, given the characteristic mix of the recipient and donor (age, disease and blood type, etc.) and the experience of similar patients in the United States as a whole.